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More charges in UND drug bust

Additional charges have been levied in the wake of the Nov. 8 raid on UND's Phi Delta Theta fraternity house by the Grand Forks Narcotics Task Force.

Additional charges have been levied in the wake of the Nov. 8 raid on UND's Phi Delta Theta fraternity house by the Grand Forks Narcotics Task Force.

Connor Moriarty, who is alleged in an affidavit to have sold drugs to a police informant, faces a charge of possession marijuana with intent to deliver and a charge of criminal conspiracy.

Both are Class B felonies, punishable by a maximum of 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

The charges were filed in Grand Forks County district court Tuesday.

UND chapter Vice President Derek Steiner said Moriarty was a pledge.

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Spencer Martin Miller, 19, initially charged with possession of marijuana with intent to deliver and possession of drug paraphernalia, was charged with another count of possession with intent to deliver on Tuesday.

Warrants for the arrest of both Moriarty and Miller were issued during Tuesday's filings.

The paraphernalia charge against Miller is a Class A misdemeanor, with a maximum penalty of one year in jail and a $2,000 fine.

The fraternity is under investigation by both the university and its international headquarters, and fraternity operations are suspended until those investigations are complete.

Five other members had misdemeanor drug charges filed against them Monday. UND chapter president Kevin Boegeman was charged last week with possession of drug paraphernalia. Only Miller and Boegeman were arrested during the raid, according to UND police.

Boegeman is scheduled to make his initial appearance Nov. 30.

Miller is scheduled for a preliminary hearing and/or arraignment Dec. 12 and the other five charged with misdemeanors are scheduled to appear Dec. 15.

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