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Moorhead teen sentenced to jail after five guilty pleas

FARGO A Fargo judge sentenced a Moorhead teen to 140 days in jail and supervised probation Wednesday for guilty pleas to five charges. Leroy Clifford Edwards pleaded guilty in Cass County District Court to felony aggravated assault and misdemeano...

FARGO

A Fargo judge sentenced a Moorhead teen to 140 days in jail and supervised probation Wednesday for guilty pleas to five charges.

Leroy Clifford Edwards pleaded guilty in Cass County District Court to felony aggravated assault and misdemeanor charges of criminal mischief, giving false information to law enforcement and minor in possession or consumption of alcohol.

The charges alleging Edwards choked a woman and caused damage to a door and a car window stem from March 12 and 13 incidents in Fargo. The case originated in juvenile court because Edwards is 17, but was transferred to adult court.

Additional charges of felony terrorizing, misdemeanor simple assault and felony aggravated assault were dismissed in exchange for the guilty pleas.

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Edwards' attorney, Monty Mertz, said a witness in the case recanted previous statements.

Edwards did not address the court before Judge Steven Marquart sentenced him to a jointly recommended one year, with all but 140 days suspended for a period of 18 months of supervised probation.

Edwards was given credit for 140 days previously spent in custody and ordered to pay $525 in fines and fees and complete a domestic violence assessment.

Mertz told Marquart that his client has been in and out of the juvenile system in Minnesota for years.

The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead and the Herald are Forum Communications co. newspapers.

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