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Mobile home destroyed, several pets killed in Minnesota fire

DETROIT LAKES, Minn. -- A wood-burning stove is believed to be responsible for a fire that destroyed a mobile home and killed several pets Thursday a few miles west of Detroit Lakes.

DETROIT LAKES, Minn. -- A wood-burning stove is believed to be responsible for a fire that destroyed a mobile home and killed several pets Thursday a few miles west of Detroit Lakes.

A young couple, Kyler Groft and Courtney Goettel, lived in the home, along with a child, Goettel said in an email.

The home is owned by a relative who works as a long-haul trucker and stayed there occasionally, according to Becker County sheriff's Sgt. Shane Richard.

The home is located north of Izzo's bar, on the other side of the BNSF railway tracks that run alongside Highway 10.

Nobody was home at 10:45 a.m. when the fire was reported, and six pets are believed to have died.

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Firefighters found the bodies of two dogs and two cats in the home, and two other cats were missing, said Audubon Fire Chief Darcy Savig.

The fire in the older-model, single-wide mobile home was relatively advanced when it was reported by a passerby who noticed the smoke, Savig said.

The fire is believed to have started in a wood stove located in a lean-to addition to the mobile home.

Related Topics: FIRES
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