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Missing Minnesota girls found safe in Grand Forks

Two northwest Minnesota teens were found safe in Grand Forks, nearly a month after disappearing from a juvenile detention facility in Bemidji, Minn. Jordan Krolak, 17, was found Saturday night, according to a Facebook post from the Marshall Count...

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Two northwest Minnesota teens were found safe in Grand Forks, nearly a month after disappearing from a juvenile detention facility in Bemidji, Minn.

Jordan Krolak, 17, was found Saturday night, according to a Facebook post from the Marshall County Sheriff's Office.

Krolak went missing June 5, the same day as Casey Danielson, also 17, of Bigfork, Minn. Both had been staying at the Northwestern Minnesota Juvenile Center, according to their mothers.
Casey Danielson was also found and is at a juvenile facility in North Dakota, according to her mother Robin Danielson.

"I am very, very relieved that she was found," Robin Danielson said.

The Marshall County Sheriff's Office wrote that Krolak is "doing well."

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