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Minnesota Supreme Court denies Amy Senser freedom bid in fatal hit-and-run

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -- The Minnesota Supreme Court has refused to hear Amy Senser's appeal of her conviction in a fatal hit-and-run. The court denied Senser's petition for review in a one-sentence order written by Chief Justice Lorie Gildea (GIL...

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -- The Minnesota Supreme Court has refused to hear Amy Senser's appeal of her conviction in a fatal hit-and-run.

The court denied Senser's petition for review in a one-sentence order written by Chief Justice Lorie Gildea (GILL'-day). That means Senser will remain in prison until at least October 2014, when she is scheduled for supervised release.

Senser, wife of former Minnesota Vikings player Joe Senser, was convicted last year of criminal vehicular homicide in the death of 38-year-old Anousone Phanthavong (ah-NOO'-sahn PAN'-tah-wong). Phanthavong was struck while refilling the gas tank of his car on a Minneapolis exit ramp two years ago.

Amy Senser testified that she didn't know she struck a person when she left the scene that night.

Her attorney, Eric Nelson, declined to comment to the Star Tribune.

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Information from: Star Tribune, http://www.startribune.com

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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