Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Minnesota checks 39 bars for liquor, gambling compliance

ST. PAUL, Minn. -- In a recent effort to ensure compliance with Minnesota alcohol and gambling laws, agents from the Department of Public Safety Alcohol and Gambling Enforcement Division, along with the Gambling Control Board, conducted random ch...

 

ST. PAUL, Minn. - In a recent effort to ensure compliance with Minnesota alcohol and gambling laws, agents from the Department of Public Safety Alcohol and Gambling Enforcement Division, along with the Gambling Control Board, conducted random checks of 39 bars around the state during a two-month period.

No violations were found in 80 percent of the establishments. The random checks were conducted in 15 establishments in Winona, 10 in  Mankato and 14 in St. Cloud. Agents discovered minor infractions in seven of the establishments that included contaminated products, illegal play of pull-tabs by employees, an illegal raffle, serving of prohibited “mystery shots” and pull-tab inventory not up to date.

Contamination is one of the more frequently found violations in the alcohol industry. Contaminated liquor most commonly contains fly-like insects or bottles that have been tampered with and the product diluted. To avoid contamination, establishments should cover liquor bottles with a secured lid or use covered or screened pour spouts.

The random compliance checks also focused on liquor license inspections that include required license postings, records and receipts, and checking the purity of alcohol. DPS-AGED agents also reviewed legal gambling activities, such as pull-tabs, and investigated any potentially illegal sports betting. No fines or citations were issued during the checks as the mission was to educate establishments.

ADVERTISEMENT

What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.