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Minneapolis man charged with selling heroin in East Grand Forks

A Minneapolis man is behind bars in Polk County on charges he sold heroin in East Grand Forks last year. Christopher Obrien Shaw, 32, faces one count of sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a felony. If convicted, Shaw could be sen...

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A Minneapolis man is behind bars in Polk County on charges he sold heroin in East Grand Forks last year.

Christopher Obrien Shaw, 32, faces one count of sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a felony. If convicted, Shaw could be sentenced to as many as 30 years in prison.

According to the criminal complaint, the Pine-to-Prairie Drug Task Force set up a controlled buy using a confidential informant to procure heroin at the Liberty Lanes Bowling Alley in East Grand Forks on Aug. 18, 2015.

An informant bought 2.6 grams of a substance that field-tested positive for heroin for $900, the complaint states. The money was provided by the task force. The complaint states police pulled over the vehicle Shaw had driven to the sale, and identified him, but did not attempt to make an arrest at that time. The confidential informant also pointed Shaw out of a lineup, the complaint states.

A summons for Shaw to appear in Polk County court was ordered on Jan. 21. According to East Grand Forks Police, Shaw was in custody on another charge and transferred up to Polk County on Wednesday.

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He was convicted of giving a police officer a false name in 2015, court records show.

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