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Marshals nab Alaskan fugitive in McVille, N.D.

A man wanted on charges of assault and attempted murder in Alaska has been captured on a remote ranch near McVille, N.D., the U.S. Marshals Service said in a news release.

James Mead
James Mead

A man wanted on charges of assault and attempted murder in Alaska has been captured on a remote ranch near McVille, N.D., the U.S. Marshals Service said in a news release.

Alaska officials learned that James Lyle Mead was near McVille, a town of about 400 people in southern Nelson County. Local marshals were notified, and they arrested Mead on Thursday, the release says.

"We assume he might have been working on a ranch or something," said David Long, head of the Alaska Fugitive Task Force. "We tracked him through just good old fashioned police work."

Mead, 44, is accused of shooting Lance Scott in February 2009 in Delta Junction, a town about 100 miles southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska. Not long after the alleged incident, Mead went to Canada, but was detained by authorities there. An administrative error led to his release, and he was allowed to cross the border on foot at Blaine, Wash., in May 2009, the release states.

North Dakota authorities are seeking to extradite Mead to Alaska. He's due in state District Court in Grand Forks on March 29. A message left for him at the Grand Forks County jail was not returned Monday evening.

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Ingersoll reports on crime and courts. Reach him at (701) 780-1269; (800) 477-6572, ext. 269; or send e-mail to aingersoll@gfherald.com .

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