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Marilyn's advice: To get ahead, show a little respect

You never forget your first job. Mine was peeling potatoes and running a dishwasher in a cafe when I was 15. I was thinking about that when I visited the Job Fair at the Alerus Center this week. So, I asked a few people about their first jobs. --...

You never forget your first job. Mine was peeling potatoes and running a dishwasher in a cafe when I was 15.

I was thinking about that when I visited the Job Fair at the Alerus Center this week. So, I asked a few people about their first jobs.

-- Laura Munski found employment at $2.25 an hour milking cows in a dairy before school in the morning when she was about 14. She learned a lot about cows.

-- Dakota Huseby worked at a Taco Bell for $3.25 an hour when she was 16. One thing she learned was not to spout off at the boss.

-- Debi Steding was cashier at a car wash on weekends for $3.75 an hour when she was 15. She learned about cars.

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-- Tim Zejdlik found his first employment as a bus boy at the DAV-VFW club in Grand Forks for $1.40 an hour. He learned that the customer is always right.

I'm not exactly hunting for a new job or a change in career at my age, but I found the Job Fair exciting and interesting. One of the free sessions was titled "How to Get Along, Get Noticed and Get Ahead." So I moseyed in there and took a seat at the session presented by Zejdlik, who is with Job Service of North Dakota.

What he said made sense to me. He talked about smiling and being positive. He talked about being accountable by showing up for work on time and being dependable. He says you need to be open to criticism. And above all else, he talked about respect. That draws people to you. A lack of respect is the No. 1 reason people lose their jobs. The second reason people fail at jobs is lack of communication. You have to listen to others and realize it isn't all about you. And, of course, you have to perform well to keep a job.

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Vroom-vroom

The last weekend of April rolls in with the grass turning green and golfers strolling the fairways. River Cities Speedway opens tonight and you will hear the vroom-vroom-vroom across town all summer long on Friday nights. . . . Einar Einarson and Ruth Ann Tuseth are presenting a Pro Musica concert tonight at First Presbyterian Church. . . . The Shrine Circus runs today through the Sunday matinee at the Ralph. . . . And Soulful Motion is being presented tonight and Saturday at UND Burtness Theatre. . . . Chris Linnares Diva Dance is on Saturday in the Alerus. . . . Nick Swardson will be live in the Chester Fritz for UND students Saturday night. . . . Grand Forks Symphony presents "Worlds Ahead" on Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon in the Empire Arts Center. . . . The Red River Valley Motorcyclists have their annual show scheduled Saturday and Sunday in Purpur and Gambucci Arenas. . . . And there's a public artist reception Saturday evening in Third Street Gallery. . . . Chipped beef and toast is once again on the menu for the annual gathering of U.S. Navy and other veterans at the Dakota Bull Session in Devils Lake this weekend. . . . If you love a band, you can hear two of them in a free concert Monday evening at UND Memorial Union when the UND Band and City Band team up. . . .

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Ask Marilyn

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How do you know it's on the up and up when young people come around collecting Dollars for Scholars in Greater Grand Forks Wednesday evening?
They will carry Dollars for Scholars receipt books. They're working for a goal of $28,000 for students in all the local high schools. The usual range of gifts is $5 to $20.

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Kirk and James

Cheerful person of the week: Kirk Misialek. Runner-up: James Hannon.

Reach Hagerty at mhagerty@gfherald.com or (701) 772-1055.

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