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MARILYN HAGERTY: Giving homes make room for kids in need

Dear Katie Campbell, As Christmas approaches, the tables are set. The stockings are hung. Families gather. And as an 18-year-old freshman at UND, you are looking forward to going home to nearby Finley, N.D. You say that in your house, there is al...

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Dear Katie Campbell,

As Christmas approaches, the tables are set. The stockings are hung. Families gather.

And as an 18-year-old freshman at UND, you are looking forward to going home to nearby Finley, N.D. You say that in your house, there is always room for one more.

For the past 15 years your parents, Tom and Theresa Campbell, have taken in foster children. He works at the grain elevator, and your mother is busy at home.

Your family welcomes children who may have more needs than those who go into regular foster care. The program is called PATH.

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I have been hearing about it from Kate Kenna. Since retiring as director Northeast Human Service Center, she is helping channel children with more needs into PATH.

She told me about you and your family. And I enjoyed meeting you for an interview in the Memorial Union at UND.

I always wondered if children resented their parents taking in more children. But you seem to delight in the big extended family in your home in Finley.

Kellyn Morlock of the PATH office at 212 S. Fourth St. here said some children need more support than they get in a regular foster home.

They say there is a need right now for around 25 homes. And there are not enough doors open.

Your parents had three children of their own. Then they adopted two. And now there are four in PATH foster care at your house.

It's a good thing you have enough room so everyone can have their own space. You make room for the two dogs named Poochie and Buddy. You all get along with three cats-Tinka, Shanique and Foxy.

You knew Thanksgiving would be busy at your place. And all of you children would be helping your mom.

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You were going to play games and watch a movie.

You told me you are majoring in psychology at UND. And you said you would take in foster children when you have your own home. It has helped you to be more open to those with other backgrounds.

Well, I know you weren't looking for any bouquets. I'm just glad I had a chance to talk-and learn from you.

Somehow my heart is filled with more of the Christmas spirit after learning about homes where the door is open to those in need.

Merry Christmas!

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