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Man sentenced for trying to sexually assault boy in Nelson County

LAKOTA, N.D. -- A Grand Forks man has been ordered to spend more than four years behind bars for trying to sexually assault a juvenile boy in Nelson County.

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Leo Borgen

LAKOTA, N.D. -- A Grand Forks man has been ordered to spend more than four years behind bars for trying to sexually assault a juvenile boy in Nelson County.

Leo Lars Borgen, 52, was sentenced Thursday in Nelson County District Court to 10 years in prison for a Class B felony count of attempted gross sexual imposition. Five years of that sentence will be suspended, and he was credited 281 days for time served.

Prosecutors accused Borgen of attempting to sexually assault the boy on June 12 in the backseat of Borgen’s car, according to court documents. The defendant thought the boy was asleep at the time, court documents said.

Borgen is a registered sex offender and has a criminal history, including two other cases of sexual assault. In 2010, he pleaded guilty in Grand Forks District Court to a Class A felony of gross sexual imposition after investigators said he admitted to giving his adult victim painkillers, according to Herald archives. Borgen then forced the victim to perform a sexual act, investigators said.

He also pleaded guilty to a Nelson County misdemeanor charge of sexual assault in 2007.

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A misdemeanor charge of contributing to the delinquency of a minor in the most recent case was dismissed.

Court documents list Borgen’s residence as Bismarck, but he was living at 506 N. Fourth St. in Grand Forks when he was arrested.

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Leo Borgen

Related Topics: BISMARCKNELSON COUNTY
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