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Man pleads guilty to leading police on 110 mph chase with stolen motorcycle

A Dunseith, N.D., man pleaded guilty Friday to stealing a motorcycle and running from police. Holden Michael Myers, 20, will spend 18 months on probation and spent just over a month behind bars. Court documents said Myers was riding a stolen 2007...

Myers Holden.jpg
Holden Michael Myers

A Dunseith, N.D., man pleaded guilty Friday to stealing a motorcycle and running from police.

Holden Michael Myers, 20, will spend 18 months on probation and spent just over a month behind bars.

Court documents said Myers was riding a stolen 2007 Yamaha motorcycle on the 200 block of DeMers Avenue around 12:30 a.m. on Sept. 28. When police tried to pull him over, he sped up and led officers on a 110 mph chase, an affidavit for his arrest said.

Myers lost control around the 2300 block of Airport Drive and crashed, reports said. He ran, but was caught by police, the affidavit said.

Myers was wearing a helmet, but had minor injuries from the crash. The motorcycle was totaled. Myers said he did not know the owner of the motorcycle.

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Myers' attorney, Patricia Castro, said he has a baby on the way and wants to avoid jail time so he can provide for his family.

District Judge Jay Knudson warned Myers if he breaks the law again his punishment will be more severe.

"Do you really think you can outrun the cops now? It's not the Wild West out here anymore," he said. "Everyone has cellphones, drones, there's videos."

Myers is a first-time offender. As part of the plea agreement, his charges for driving with a suspended license and reckless endangerment were dropped because he pleaded guilty to theft and fleeing from police.

"What you've done is really stupid and you probably deserve more time," Knudson said.

Related Topics: POLICETHEFT
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