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Man in Grand Forks standoff to avoid jail if he completes treatment

A Gilby, N.D., man involved in an armed standoff with Grand Forks police last month will not go to jail if he completes recommended treatment, according to court documents.

A Gilby, N.D., man involved in an armed standoff with Grand Forks police last month will not go to jail if he completes recommended treatment, according to court documents.

Zackery Thomas Crandall, 28, was charged with terrorizing, a Class C felony, after a Feb. 12 welfare check turned into an armed standoff between Crandall and police at 1113 Fifth Ave. N. in Grand Forks.

When police arrived at the house that afternoon, Crandall opened the door with a handgun held to his head, stating, "I don't want to hurt anyone but myself. Just go away," according to court records.

Crandall made no threats directed at officers, but police and SWAT members surrounded the house. Crandall surrendered peacefully around 7:45 p.m. and was taken into custody for evaluation.

If Crandall complies with recommendations from Northeast Human Service Center for chemical dependency and mental health evaluations and treatments, then Crandall's charge will be dismissed with prejudice, according to an agreement Crandall signed Wednesday.

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He also must avoid criminal charges until March 23, complete 60 hours of community service and pay $250 in court fees, according to the agreement.

The final term of the agreement states he "will not possess any firearms."

Crandall faced a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine for the terrorizing charge.

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