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Man in first N.D. human trafficking case sentenced

FARGO - A Fargo man who was the first in the state of North Dakota to be charged under a 2009 human trafficking law was sentenced Tuesday in Cass County District Court to three years in prison.

FARGO - A Fargo man who was the first in the state of North Dakota to be charged under a 2009 human trafficking law was sentenced Tuesday in Cass County District Court to three years in prison.

Chad Lee Lindley, who is in his 40s, pleaded guilty to the human trafficking charge that alleged he posted an ad on Craigslist to recruit young women to work as prostitutes.

He also pleaded guilty to three other charges, including a controlled substance charge and charges of using a minor in a sexual performance and luring minors by computer.

Lindley was sentenced to a total of three years on those charges, which are to be served concurrently with his sentence on the human trafficking charge.

Prosecutor Reid Brady had asked for a five-year prison sentence, stating Lindley had been "driven by greed and lust to exploit others."

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Lindley's attorney had recommended a sentence of 18 months.

Judge John Irby gave Lindley eight years, with five years suspended.

After serving his time, Lindley will be on supervised probation.

Before North Dakota passed its human trafficking statute in 2009 it was one of 11 states that didn't specifically ban trafficking.

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