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Man gets 68 months for role in fatal meth-fueled wreck

THIEF RIVER FALLS--A Thief River Falls man was sentenced to serve more than five years in state prison for his role in a May 2015 crash that killed a Warren, Minn., man.

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Scott Wayne Srnsky

THIEF RIVER FALLS-A Thief River Falls man was sentenced to serve more than five years in state prison for his role in a May 2015 crash that killed a Warren, Minn., man.

Scott Wayne Srnsky, 42, was convicted of criminal vehicular manslaughter, a felony, in August for the death of Jacob James Kasprowicz, 29, in what authorities described as a meth-fueled game of chicken.

On Monday, he was sentenced to serve 68 months in state correctional facilities. He will receive credit for 483 days served.

Srnsky was operating a vehicle May 26 in Pennington County while under the influence of methamphetamine when the head-on collision occurred on 190th Street Northeast near U.S. Highway 59 north of Thief River Falls, according to a criminal complaint.
As Srnsky turned onto 190th Street, he accelerated his vehicle, which crossed the centerline and struck the oncoming Kasprowicz vehicle head-on, the complaint stated. Rescue techniques were used in attempts to save the lives of both drivers. However, Kasprowicz died at the scene.
A Minnesota State Patrol investigation, which included evaluations of black boxes located on both vehicles, revealed that Srnsky "accelerated at a high rate of RPMs" once he turned onto 190th Street Northeast.
Based on an examination of a blood sample, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension report stated Srnsky was under the influence of methamphetamine at the time of the crash.

Related Topics: CRIME
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