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Man arrested for public urination at GF motel

A man arrested only days ago for indecent exposure at a Grand Forks motel has been arrested again on similar charges of disorderly conduct. William Thoreson, 54, was arrested during the noon hour Sunday at the Ideal Inn, 2201 Gateway Drive, after...

A man arrested only days ago for indecent exposure at a Grand Forks motel has been arrested again on similar charges of disorderly conduct.

William Thoreson, 54, was arrested during the noon hour Sunday at the Ideal Inn, 2201 Gateway Drive, after other guests there, including children, saw him urinating off a balcony, according to a Grand Forks police officer. Thoreson was very inebriated and voiced confusion about why he was being arrested, the officer said.

Thoreson previously lived in the Brainerd, Minn., area, but has been working and staying in Grand Forks, the officer said. He had about $200 in cash on him, enough to make his bail Sunday, the officer said.

On June 24, Thoreson was arrested at the Budget Inn Express after two women and a girl said he had exposed himself and made lewd gestures and asked for sex. He was charged with disorderly conduct, which is a Class B misdemeanor.

Thoreson was brought to the Grand Forks County jail at 12:47 p.m. Sunday and released by 1 p.m. after paying the $151 bond.

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Alcohol abuse appears to be connected to Thoreson's behavior, the officer said. In both incidents, Thoreson was very drunk, witnesses and police said.

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