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Man accused of trying to kick own feces at Fargo police

FARGO A Fargo man is accused of trying to kick his own feces at police officers who responded to a party at his home Friday night. Officers came into contact with 64-year-old Dennis Fike at 11:30 p.m. while responding to a report of a loud party ...

FARGO

A Fargo man is accused of trying to kick his own feces at police officers who responded to a party at his home Friday night.

Officers came into contact with 64-year-old Dennis Fike at 11:30 p.m. while responding to a report of a loud party and violation of a protection order at his home at 911 5th Ave. S., Sgt. Ross Renner said.

"Sometime during that contact, Mr. Fike pulled his pants down, defecated on the floor, made a comment to the officers and, at which point, attempted to kick fecal matter at the officers who were present," Renner said Monday.

Renner said Fike indicated to police that he had to go to the bathroom, but there weren't enough officers present to allow him to do so, because they were still waiting for backup.

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"So, he, uh, yeah," he said.

Officers restrained Fike, arrested him and took him to the Cass County Jail. He was charged Monday in Cass County District Court with two felonies, preventing arrest or discharge of other duties and an attempt to commit a class C felony. He also faces one misdemeanor charge for disobeying a judicial order.

Bail was set at $3,000, and Fike was ordered to maintain weekly contact with his attorney. A message left at the Cass County Jail for Fike was not returned.

Fike's next court appearance was set for Oct. 1.

The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead and the Herald are Forum Communications Co. newspapers.

Related Topics: CASS COUNTY
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