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Man accused in convenience store sex assault could face life in prison

FARGO - The man accused of storming behind the counter of a Mapleton convenience store to beat and sexually assault an employee finally made it to court on Monday.

2177679+Abdulrahman Ibrahim Ali.jpg
Abdulrahman Ali

FARGO – The man accused of storming behind the counter of a Mapleton convenience store to  beat and sexually assault an employee  finally made it to court on Monday.

He refused to leave his jail cell before his first scheduled court date Friday.

Abdulrahman Ali faces five related charges, including a Class AA felony charge of gross sexual imposition that can carry a sentence of life in prison.

Prosecutors allege Ali locked the employee in a bathroom to assault her while a customer and co-worker were nearby.

Ali refused to come out of the bathroom when law enforcement arrived.

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He also refused to leave a jail cell and go to court for his initial appearance on Friday, but he did not give a reason why.

Ali appeared in person Monday to hear the charges against him.

He has not yet applied for a public defender, something he agreed to do well ahead of his next court appearance in January.

His bail remains set at $1 million.

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