Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Male infertility may cause marital stress

Authors of recent study hypothesize that men with male factor infertility or MFI may experience greater emotional and social distress and lower levels of marital functioning than men in infertile couples without MFI.

Authors of recent study hypothesize that men with male factor infertility or MFI may experience greater emotional and social distress and lower levels of marital functioning than men in infertile couples without MFI.

Self-report questionnaires and interviews were used to evaluate infertile couples' experiences at baseline and various follow-up points in time. The marital disagreement index; life impact, perceived stress, partner satisfaction, sexual satisfaction and sexual function scores; and family understanding, family and friend impact scales were used to evaluate marital and interpersonal function.

Twenty-five percent reported high levels of relationship stress, and 15 percent reported serious issues with their marriage, 17 percent pointed to infertility treatment as a source of significant stress, and 1 percent reported marital infidelity.

This study used validated measures of psychosocial function and revealed that men in infertile couples experience significant psychosocial stress. However, this study did not identify major differences in psychosocial or marital functioning between men with and without a male factor diagnosis.

Anyone who treats infertile couples is aware of the fact that infertility places strains on the individuals and the couple. Interestingly, the couples with male factor infertility did not appear to differ from the other couples. Nevertheless, the authors wrote, professionals must be aware of these stresses and counsel patients about these potential stresses.

What To Read Next
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.
2022 saw more than three times as many pediatric (up to age 5) cannabis edible exposures in Minnesota compared to 2021. Here's what you can do to prevent your toddler from getting into the gummies.