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Make A Wish fund-raiser tonight in GF

An ice cream social fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. tonight at Cold Stone Creamery in Grand Forks. It's part of a companywide effort for Make-A-Wish and its chapters.

An ice cream social fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. tonight at Cold Stone Creamery in Grand Forks. It's part of a companywide effort for Make-A-Wish and its chapters.

Billed the "World's Largest Ice Cream Social," the Cold Stone event will provide - in exchange for a donation - a three-ounce treat called Jack's Creation, a mix of sweet cream ice cream with brownie, sprinkles and fudge created by a 5-year-old Make-A-Wish child.

All proceeds will benefit the local chapter of Make-A-Wish, a nonprofit that grants wishes to children with life-threatening medical conditions.

An area Make-A-Wish recipient, Ellen Gregoire of Larimore, N.D., will help serve the treats. Make-A-Wish flew the girl and family members to Vancouver, B.C., where she met the puppies from the "Air Buddies" films. The film production company later gave her one of the "Air Buddies" puppies.

Cold Stone Creamery is at 3551 32nd Ave. S. For more information, go to www.coldstonecreamery.com

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