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Long winter continues with more snow in Grand Forks region

If you looked out the window Thursday afternoon in Grand Forks, you probably saw something all too familiar. Much of eastern North Dakota and Minnesota received even more snow, adding on to what has been a lengthy winter. Grand Forks received one...

Two people jog in wintry conditions
Gabe and Barbara Arntson jog in wintry conditions along Bygland Road in East Grand Forks Thursday. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

If you looked out the window Thursday afternoon in Grand Forks, you probably saw something all too familiar.

Much of eastern North Dakota and Minnesota received even more snow, adding on to what has been a lengthy winter. Grand Forks received one inch, but matters got worse to the south and east.

The National Weather Service reported Fargo received 2.5 inches, and some areas in central Minnesota were forecast to receive more than 10 inches.

"It's not so much that snow in April is unusual, but it's the persistent cold weather," said Dan Riddle, a meteorologist with the weather service office in Grand Forks. "We have had consistently low temperatures all this month, and we're still looking at temperatures 15 to 20 degrees below normal for another seven-day stretch."

Depression

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If you're feeling down, you're probably not alone. According to the medical website, webMD.com, prolonged exposure to winter weather can cause seasonal affective disorder, or seasonal depression. Some symptoms include decreased levels of energy, increase in appetite, fatigue and weight gain.

The website suggests those experiencing some of these symptoms maintain as regular of a schedule as possible. A well-balanced diet, 30 minutes of exercise three times a week and staying involved in social activities help keep symptoms at bay.

Spending time outside, even when cloudy, can also provide your body with the daylight your body craves in the winter months.

"Even if we had mid-40s, I think people would be feeling a little better," Riddle said.

He noted the latest day in the year the service registered its first 50 degree day in Fargo was April 17, with a similar figure for Grand Forks.

"We don't even have 40 degrees in our forecast yet, so we will be pushing into setting records like that," Riddle said.

No relief

The weather service expects the unseasonable weather to continue through the weekend, with temperatures hovering in the 20s and 30s. Light snow in Grand Forks on Friday is expected to give way to some sunshine Saturday, but a storm system that could bring heavy snow to northern North Dakota and Minnesota will move into the area Sunday.

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The forecast for Grand Forks include:

• Friday: Cloudy; high near 35 degrees. Chance of snow 40 percent.

• Friday night: Cloudy, with a chance of snow showers in the early evening; low near 19 degrees.

• Saturday: Partly cloudy; high near 37 degrees. Chance of snow 10 percent.

• Sunday: Cloudy and windy, with sustained winds near 20 mph; high near 32. Chance of snow 70 percent.

Call Jeffries at (701) 780-1105; (800) 477-6572, ext. 1105; or send email to rjeffries@gfherald.com .

A deliveryman crosses DeMers Avenue
A deliveryman crosses DeMers Avenue in downtown Grand Forks, N.D. during a snow storm Thursday April 11, 2013.JOHN STENNES/GRAND FORKS HERALD

Related Topics: WEATHER
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