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Local law enforcement show solidarity with 'No-shave November'

Local residents may notice a more rugged-looking law enforcement presence this month. The Grand Forks County Sheriff's Office and Grand Forks Police Department are loosening up grooming regulations to allow officers and deputies to participate in...

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Local residents may notice a more rugged-looking law enforcement presence this month.

The Grand Forks County Sheriff's Office and Grand Forks Police Department are loosening up grooming regulations to allow officers and deputies to participate in "No-shave November" in a show of solidarity with a department family dealing with cancer.

Lt. Derik Zimmel with the Police Department said officers typically are required to be clean-shaven or to maintain a well-groomed mustache, but this month goatees and beards will be allowed.

Zimmel said a police officer's family member is going through cancer treatments, and officers and deputies wished to show their support. Law enforcement may also wear "No one fights alone" wristbands.

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