Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Legislators consider bill to allow medical, health care for minors

BISMARCK Pregnant teenage girls in North Dakota who are afraid to tell their parents about their condition are the least likely to get adequate prenatal care for their unborn babies, doctors and legislators said Tuesday.

BISMARCK Pregnant teenage girls in North Dakota who are afraid to tell their parents about their condition are the least likely to get adequate prenatal care for their unborn babies, doctors and legislators said Tuesday.

That means a lot of newborns coming into the world with health problems that could have been prevented by better nutrition and other steps their doctors could have advised, backers of Senate Bill 2181 said.

"Many minors don't come in until they're in labor," Dr. Shari Orser, a Bismarck OB-GYN, told the Senate Human Services Committee.

The bill specifically does not allow pregnant minors to seek or get an abortion without parental consent. Orser said that if an underage girl comes to her for care because she is pregnant, current state law requires her to turn the girl away until she comes back with a parent or a consent form from a parent or guardian.

No one testified against the bill.

ADVERTISEMENT

A bill similar to SB 2181 last session passed the Senate almost unanimously, said prime sponsor Sen. Karen Krebsbach, R- Minot, but then was defeated in the House.

||?Page=002 Column=002 Loose,0112.08?||

What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.