Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Lake Park council decides to appoint new mayor

LAKE PARK, Minn. -- The Lake Park City Council has decided to appoint a new mayor, rather than hold a special election to fill the position. The council voted unanimously to take applications for the mayor's job this past week after the resignati...

 

LAKE PARK, Minn. -- The Lake Park City Council has decided to appoint a new mayor, rather than hold a special election to fill the position.

The council voted unanimously to take applications for the mayor’s job this past week after the resignation of controversial former Mayor Aaron Wittnebel, whose term would have expired in 2017.

Wittnebel pleaded guilty on an Alford basis to a felony charge of financial exploitation of a vulnerable adult when he mishandled funds for his sister, who has Down syndrome, and for whom he was a guardian and conservator. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail last year through the plea agreement and is currently serving five years of supervised probation.

Residents who are interested have until 4:30 p.m. on Feb. 2 to turn in an application and a letter of interest at the city office. City council members can apply, but cannot vote to appoint themselves, said city attorney Charlie Ramstad.

ADVERTISEMENT

In the meantime, Lake Park Vice Mayor Jon Anderson was unanimously appointed interim mayor. The council will conduct interviews with those wishing to fill the seat.

What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.