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Kittson County sheriff retires after 36 years in law enforcement

HALLOCK, Minn. -- Kittson County's sheriff of 14 years has hung up his badge. After 36 years in law enforcement, Kenny Hultgren retired last week as the head of Kittson County Sheriff Department, according to a report in the North Star News. Born...

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HALLOCK, Minn. -- Kittson County’s sheriff of 14 years has hung up his badge.

After 36 years in law enforcement, Kenny Hultgren retired last week as the head of Kittson County Sheriff Department, according to a report in the North Star News.

Born in Kennedy, Minn., Hultgren began his career with the Lake Bronson, Minn., Police Department. He worked for various cities and counties as an officer, including Marshall and Grand Forks counties. He returned in 1987 to Kittson County to work as a sheriff’s deputy.

He told the North Star News he was retiring because of health issues. He fought a life-threatening blood infection last year, according to the report.

He said he had a great crew to work with, adding he will miss the work he did and the people he got to know.

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Deputy Steve Porter has taken over as sheriff. He was appointed by the Kittson County Commission because there were about two years left on Hultgren’s term. The next election for sheriff is in 2018.

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