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Kentucky firefighter dies after ice bucket challenge accident

LOUISVILLE KY. (Reuters) - A Kentucky firefighter who was severely injured a month ago while helping college students take part in an "ice-bucket" fundraiser died on Saturday from his injuries, authorities said.

LOUISVILLE KY. (Reuters) - A Kentucky firefighter who was severely injured a month ago while helping college students take part in an "ice-bucket" fundraiser died on Saturday from his injuries, authorities said.

Captain Tony Grider, 41, of Campbellsville was hurt along with three other firefighters when an aerial ladder got too close to a power line as their department doused a university band with water.

Kyle Smith, the chief of Campbellsville Fire and Rescue, said Grider died at noon at University of Louisville hospital.

"His family would like to sincerely thank all of those who have been there for them following this tragic accident," Smith said in a statement.

Grider and his three colleagues were injured on Aug. 21 when they were attempting to help students at Campbellsville University participate in the ice bucket challenge to raise funds to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

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Grider and another firefighter, 22-year-old Simon Quinn, sustained electrocution injuries in the initial incident. Two other firefighters suffered lesser injuries coming to their aid, officials said.

Quinn was released from hospital earlier this week.

"These injuries were very severe and both firefighters have fought extremely hard to overcome them," Smith said.

Arrangements for Grider's funeral service were still pending.

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