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James E. "Rick" Brown

James E. "Rick" Brown was born in Valley City on May 17, 1946. He spent his youth there with his Father Tom, mother Lilly, brother Chris, and sisters Tomi and Johanne. After graduating from high school he moved to Grand Forks to attend UND. Brigh...

James E. "Rick" Brown was born in Valley City on May 17, 1946.
He spent his youth there with his Father Tom, mother Lilly, brother Chris, and sisters Tomi and Johanne. After graduating from high school he moved to Grand Forks to attend UND. Bright, passionate, and humorous; Rick inspired students as an English Teacher at Red River High before returning to UND for his JD degree and beginning practice as a prosecuting attorney for Grand Forks County. He excelled at what he did both professionally and personally. Those that knew Rick were touched by him. It was a fundamental part of his nature to be a teacher, mentor, student, musician, comedian, philosopher, and friend. He will be greatly missed by his sons Tom and Jon, his companion Ellie, grandson Ian and daughter-in-law Drea, his brother and sisters, and all of his dear friends and family. A remembrance of Rick will be held Saturday, February 3, 2007 at 10:30 a.m. in Amundson Funeral Home, 2975 south 42nd St., Grand Forks, ND. Visitation will begin an hour prior to the service. www.amundsonfuneralhome.com

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