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It's a boy!

When Ross and Kjersten Huebner went to Altru Hospital, they expected to come home with their third child. They didn't expect to be interviewed by TV and newspaper reporters and receive a key to the city. Brooks Ross Huebner was born at 1:58 a.m. ...

When Ross and Kjersten Huebner went to Altru Hospital, they expected to come home with their third child.

They didn't expect to be interviewed by TV and newspaper reporters and receive a key to the city.

Brooks Ross Huebner was born at 1:58 a.m. on Jan. 1, becoming the first new baby born in Grand Forks in 2008 and giving the family more attention than expected.

"It's pretty funny," Ross Huebner, 26, said. "To us, it's just having another baby. But we got a bunch of free stuff, got interviewed by TV and (the Herald). It's just the date. To us, it's more important that we have a healthy baby."

The couple received gifts totaling more than $900 from local sponsors, included in a gift basket with a stack of diapers shaped like a birthday cake.

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Brooks was delivered by Grand Forks Mayor Michael Brown, a physician at Altru. Brown also gave the child a little key to the city.

"Everyone thinks its pretty cool," Ross Huebner said of their family's reaction to Brooks' star-crossed beginning.

Kjersten, 24, also said her mother, who works at Altru, is really excited.

The couple said they never expected to have a New Year's baby. Kjersten's due date was Dec. 31, and their other two children - 5-year-old daughter Ruby and 3-year-old son Benny - both arrived early.

"We never even thought about it," Ross said.

Brooks was 21 inches long and weighed 7 pounds, 14.5 ounces. When he was born, the umbilical cord was wrapped around his neck, but his parents say he's fine now.

The new baby has been sleeping a lot.

"He's pretty calm," Kjersten Huebner said. "He seems to be real laid back."

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The family returned home from the hospital Wednesday.

"It's just nice to be home," Kjersten said. "It's more quiet here."

Ross and Kjersten said they were looking forward to getting some sleep.

Reach Schuster at (701) 780-1107 or rschuster@gfherald.com .

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