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IN THE MAIL: UND wears blinders to racism

GRAND FORKS -- I got as far as the headline, "Race debate: Do recent race related issues on UND campus reflect a deeper problem? Or were kids just being kids?" when I felt like exploding (Page A1, May 11).

GRAND FORKS -- I got as far as the headline, "Race debate: Do recent race related issues on UND campus reflect a deeper problem? Or were kids just being kids?" when I felt like exploding (Page A1, May 11).

And the majority of Grand Forks' population doesn't know why.

Unless you are a minority, you wouldn't. That's me. I stay here because I haven't been discriminated against; but my daughters have. They refuse to stay because they feel this way all the time.

I'm not going to jump on that horse again. What I am taking issue with is the last question of the headline: "Or were kids just being kids?"

UND is trying to whitewash the problem again. The students whom we have been entrusted with are no longer kids. They are adults and constantly are fighting to be treated as such. Instead, we revert back to putting on blinders and only see what we want to see.

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If UND wants to increase enrollment rather than losing out to "that" school in Fargo, we have to face our demons.

Accept the fact the etching was supposed to be a swastika. It was just an idiot doing the painting.

We can't sweep it under the rug until UND acknowledges the fact we have a race relations problem. Racism at UND now focuses on an even smaller group of people. Since we are not learning from history, we are condemned to repeat it.

Saunders is a 1988, 1989 and1991 graduate of UND.

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