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IN THE MAIL: Insensitive coverage adds to family's grief

WYNDMERE, N.D. -- "After the boy died, three people who appeared to be family members walked down the gravel road toward the ambulance holding hands," the Herald reported (Page A1, July 16).

WYNDMERE, N.D. -- "After the boy died, three people who appeared to be family members walked down the gravel road toward the ambulance holding hands," the Herald reported (Page A1, July 16).

"The group took turns going into the ambulance parked on the road's shoulder. They hugged one another and were comforted by emergency workers. The boy's mother was on the scene; his father was not."

I am appalled that the Herald would print such unnecessary details on an accident that claimed the life of a child. And the photograph is a vile product of disrespect.

I know that tragedy sells, but some ethical journalists actually have passed on such vulture fare. (The actor, River Phoenix's last moments come to mind.)

During a family's darkest hour, the Herald managed to cast one more shadow. The story was going to be the newspaper's, anyway; so, why did the paper rush in and be in the middle of things?

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Herald owner Forum Communications is hitting pretty low.

Lisa Peterka

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