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IN THE MAIL: Association shows that 'every person counts'

GRAND FORKS -- Two weeks ago, local businesses and employers were able to recognize and appreciate members of their administrative staff at the Administrative Professionals Day Luncheon hosted by members of the International Association of Admini...

GRAND FORKS -- Two weeks ago, local businesses and employers were able to recognize and appreciate members of their administrative staff at the Administrative Professionals Day Luncheon hosted by members of the International Association of Administrative Professionals -- Twin Forks Chapter.

More than 130 people enjoyed words by Grand Forks chief of police John Packett and musical entertainment by Job Christenson and Marlys Murphy.

Thank you is so little for the volunteer time and energy that local IAAP members spent on the organization of an enjoyable luncheon, and for giving us a chance to say thanks to the administrative professionals who work for many of us.

Members of the IAAP demonstrate not only a high level of professionalism and work in support of their employers, but also to the community. Proceeds from this recognition luncheon were given to support children and adults with intellectual disabilities in Special Olympics.

IAAP members who made this event possible were Kristi Hegg, Joann Kuntz, Roxanne Melberg, Dorothy Ness, Kay Peterson, Diane Sherlock, Robin Thompson, Julie Sturges and Agnes Wischer. Their work and that of the association shows that every person counts and deserves our respect.

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Kathleen Meagher

Meagher is president and CEO of Special Olympics North Dakota.

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