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IN THE MAIL: Animal-rights cause doesn't belong in N.D.

HORACE, N.D. -- A new radio ad aired recently that should raise a caution light to all North Dakotans. It was about property rights, and it said there are petitions going around supporting a hunting ban on private property.

HORACE, N.D. -- A new radio ad aired recently that should raise a caution light to all North Dakotans. It was about property rights, and it said there are petitions going around supporting a hunting ban on private property.

These petitions are being backed by East Coast animal rights extremists. What are they doing here in North Dakota? They are trying to take away our right to hunt.

One of the national backers is the Humane Society of the U.S., which wants to ban all hunting, livestock, rodeos and circuses.

There is no room in North Dakota for that group or People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. First, they'll take away hunting on private property; then, they'll shift the focus toward eliminating animal agriculture altogether, just as they've tried to do in Florida and Arizona.

These animal activists need to stay away from North Dakota.

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The Humane Society of the U.S. has led the anti-hunting movement for nearly 40 years. Now, it is leading the crusade to end animal agriculture, too.

I enjoy living in North Dakota, away from the hustle and bustle of the big cities. I am an occasional hunter, and I want to see North Dakota farmers keep their land and keep their land rights.

I don't think it's fair to take away income or rights from an American citizen.

Say no to the activists, and keep our state free of East Coast animal-rights extremists.

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