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Identity of body found confirmed as missing man

MONTICELLO, Minn. -- Authorities have confirmed that a body that was recovered from a marsh near Monticello in central Minnesota on Sunday is that of Tyler Berg, 24, of St. Cloud. Berg's death is under investigation by the Wright County Sheriff's...

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MONTICELLO, Minn. -- Authorities have confirmed that a body that was recovered from a marsh near Monticello in central Minnesota on Sunday is that of Tyler Berg, 24, of St. Cloud.

Berg’s death is under investigation by the Wright County Sheriff’s Office and Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office, which confirmed the identity.

Berg was last seen at his home Nov. 22. His abandoned vehicle was discovered

the next morning near Otter Creek Park in Monticello.

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Berg is originally from Austin, Minnesota, and graduated from high school there, Tony Delhanty, Berg’s brother-in-law, told the St. Cloud Times. He had lived in St. Cloud for about three months. Berg was planning to attend St. Cloud Technical & Community College next semester for computer science, Delhanty said.

Related Topics: MONTICELLO
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