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HOW TO: Share contact info by bumping iPhones

Exchanging paper business cards is so old school. If you have an iPhone, you can exchange your contact information with another iPhone user by "bumping" your phones. For now the app only works with iPhones, but the company says it plans to suppor...

Exchanging paper business cards is so old school. If you have an iPhone, you can exchange your contact information with another iPhone user by "bumping" your phones. For now the app only works with iPhones, but the company says it plans to support other phones in the future.

1. Search for the free "Bump" app in the iPhone App Store, download and install it.

2. Open up the application on your iPhone, agree to the terms of service and allow the app to know your location.

3. Click on "My Profile." If you already have your contact information saved in your iPhone address book, tap "Select" to choose the appropriate address book entry. If not, click "Create," fill out the contact information and save the entry.

4. By default, Bump will share your phone number, e-mail address and photo with another user. To change which pieces of information are shared, tap one (i.e. "email") to select or de-select it.

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5. When you meet another iPhone owner who has the Bump app, you and the other party need to open the Bump application. Next, bump your hand against the other person's hand (the phones don't need to touch, just your hands). Tap to accept the transfer of contact information. You will see a confirmation that the other person's contact information has been received. The contact information has now been added to your iPhone's address book.

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