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Heritage Village Christmas Festival attracts children, Santa Claus

Children's singing filled the Granville Church Saturday in East Grand Forks, drawing a crowd that spilled outside the small building. Several children topped with winter hats stood before families to sing "Jingle Bells" and other Christmas songs ...

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New Heights Elementary teacher Alyce Stokke directs her first graders as they sing "Jingle Bells" during the Heritage Village Festival in East Grand Forks Saturday. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

Children's singing filled the Granville Church Saturday in East Grand Forks, drawing a crowd that spilled outside the small building.

Several children topped with winter hats stood before families to sing "Jingle Bells" and other Christmas songs for the Heritage Village Christmas Festival. Jeanne O'Neil of the O'Neil Family Band played accordion.

"The kids volunteered today to come out and sing," Heritage Village President Kim Nelson said.

Families participated in crafts, a bake sale and an appearance by Santa Claus and some of his reindeer as they walked around the Village's small buildings. The lack of snow didn't deter children from building snowmen on the unseasonably warm day.

The annual event usually draws a large crowd, and this year organizers added a pancake feed, Nelson said.

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Santa Claus greets people at the Heritage Village in East Grand Forks during the annual festival. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

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