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Heitkamp reintroduces bill on Native American children

U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., reintroduced a bill Thursday to address problems faced by Native American children. The bill, which has 22 supporters, would create a national Commission on Native American Children, according to a press release ...

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp
U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp
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U.S. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., reintroduced a bill Thursday to address problems faced by Native American children.

The bill, which has 22 supporters, would create a national Commission on Native American Children, according to a press release from the senator's office. The commission would conduct "an intensive study into issues facing Native children" including poverty, child abuse, substance abuse and crime.

According to a 2014 report from the White House, suicide rates among Native American children are 2.5 times the national average, and more than one in three American Indian and Alaska Native children live in poverty.

"For far too long the potential, the creativity, and the talent of our Native children has been drowned out by the cyclical nature of extreme poverty, substance and domestic abuse, and a lack of economic and educational opportunities -- but they are still striving to persevere," Heitkamp said in a press release.

The proposed commission would address how to better use existing resources, increase coordination between existing programs, and find stronger private sector partnerships, Heitkamp's press release said.

Related Topics: HEIDI HEITKAMP
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