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Hastings attorney suspended for misconduct

HASTINGS, Minn. -- The Minnesota Supreme Court has suspended Hastings attorney Rebekah Nett from practicing law for misconduct. The Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility had requested that the court take disciplinary action against Nett, ...

HASTINGS, Minn. -- The Minnesota Supreme Court has suspended Hastings attorney Rebekah Nett from practicing law for misconduct.

The Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility had requested that the court take disciplinary action against Nett, alleging violations of the Minnesota Professional Code of Conduct that included a pattern of bad faith litigation and reckless and harassing statements.

The Supreme Court last week unanimously approved Nett's indefinite suspension. Nett also has no right to petition for reinstatement for nine months.

The professional responsibility board's petition cited a number of court cases in which it claimed Nett filed false statements, failed to complete her research and embarrassed court officers.

Nett also has been sanctioned by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and ordered to pay $5,000. An appeal failed. The appeals court subsequently suspended her from the 7th Circuit Bar.

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In May, Nett was barred from practicing law before the U.S. District Court in Minnesota.

In 2011, Nett accused a judge of being a "Catholic witch hunter," and said the court system is "composed of a bunch of ignoramus, bigoted Catholic beasts that carry the sword of the church."

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