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Greenway Takeover Festival kicks off with four days of entertainment on the river

The first Greenway Takeover Festival took off Thursday in downtown Grand Forks with a musical lineup that included Jozy Bernadette and the Gear Daddies.

Sarah Schreiner tosses a bean bag at Thursday's Greenway Takeover Festival downtown. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald
Sarah Schreiner tosses a bean bag at Thursday's Greenway Takeover Festival downtown. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

The first Greenway Takeover Festival took off Thursday in downtown Grand Forks with a musical lineup that included Jozy Bernadette and the Gear Daddies.

In addition to hearing bands, Takeover attendees ate and drank from food trucks and beer stations and played lawn games on the Greenway grass.

The free festival combines events by four groups: Alley Alive on Thursday; Happy Harry's Blues on the Red, Friday; the Big Forkin' Festival, Saturday; and the North Dakota Museum of Art, Sunday.

Festivities are held north of the Sorlie Bridge downtown.

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Gayl Haufe, a Greenway Takeover Festival volunteer, plays with 21-month-old Alijah Dowling on the opening night of the festival on the Greenway in downtown Grand Forks. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald
Gayl Haufe, a Greenway Takeover Festival volunteer, plays with 21-month-old Alijah Dowling on the opening night of the festival on the Greenway in downtown Grand Forks. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

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