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Grand Forks woman threatens to kill man with knife, charges say

A Grand Forks woman was charged after she allegedly tried to choke and beat a man before threatening him with a knife. Deneshia Tanae Brown, 21, was charged with terrorizing, burglary, assault and criminal mischief. Court documents said she was a...

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A Grand Forks woman was charged after she allegedly tried to choke and beat a man before threatening him with a knife.

Deneshia Tanae Brown, 21, was charged with terrorizing, burglary, assault and criminal mischief.

Court documents said she was asked by a man she knew to send money to someone in Williston and was given extra money to transfer the cash. The man asked for change and Brown refused, court documents say.

She later grabbed him by the neck and tried to choke him on his bed and repeatedly hit him in the face, court documents said. He moved into the living room and asked Brown to leave, but she kept hitting him.

After she left, the man locked the door and she later kicked it in, the documents said. She grabbed a large knife from the kitchen and threatened to kill him, according to an affidavit for her arrest. The man called 911 and Brown allegedly dropped the knife. She then texted the man and said "you better not press charges you better just take this lost and walk away. We both said words out of anger so drop it and move on!!! And I'll do the same." The message had kissy-face emojis at the end, according to court documents.

Related Topics: POLICE
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