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Grand Forks Public Health set to offer second coronavirus booster shot

The shots will be offered for people over 50 years of age, and those ages 12 and older who are moderately to severely immunocompromised.

The Grand Forks County Office Building. Photo by Nick Nelson for the Grand Forks Herald.
The Grand Forks County Office Building. Photo by Nick Nelson for the Grand Forks Herald.
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GRAND FORKS — Grand Forks Public Health will begin offering second booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccine beginning on Tuesday, April 5, for select groups of people.

Information about getting a second booster shot was announced in a GFPH release on Thursday, March 31. News about the shots being offered locally comes following the second booster's authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to the GFPH release.

The shots will be offered for people over 50 years of age, and those ages 12 and older who are moderately to severely immunocompromised. The shots will be available by appointment at Grand Forks Public Health, located inside the County Office Building at 151 S. Fourth Street, Suite N301. Appointments can be scheduled by calling 701-787-8100. Walk-in appointments are not being offered.

“COVID-19 vaccine supply is adequate, allowing for vaccines to be easily accessible at many locations in the community, including health care providers, pharmacies and local public health,” said Danielle Gratton, immunization program manager. “We (GFPH) are no longer operating sites at the Grand Cities Mall or the Alerus Center, but do offer immunization appointments at the Grand Forks Public Health Department. As a reminder, people may be vaccinated against other diseases at the same time as receiving a COVID-19 booster, so it is a good time to make sure you are up to date on routine vaccines.”

Individuals may receive a second booster dose if it has been at least four months since their first booster dose. Immunocompromised individuals may receive a total of five doses, three in the primary series and two booster doses.

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According to GFPH, current Food and Drug Administration evidence indicates some waning of protection over time against serious outcomes from COVID-19 in older and immunocompromised individuals.

No insurance is necessary for the COVID-19 vaccine, and it is free of charge. Insurance will be billed for other vaccines.

Adam Kurtz is the community editor for the Grand Forks Herald. He covers higher education and other topics in Grand Forks County and the city.

Kurtz joined the Herald in July 2019. He covered business and county government topics before covering higher education and some military topics.

Tips and story ideas are welcome. Get in touch with him at akurtz@gfherald.com, or DM at @ByAdamKurtz.

Desk: 701-780-1110
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