Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Grand Forks Public Health has acquired and distributed 280 naloxone kits for overdose

Grand Forks Public Health has purchased nearly 240 Narcan kits for opioid overdose using a state-targeted response grant from the North Dakota Department of Human Services.

The UND Police Department has trained its officers to handle Narcan, a nasal spray version of naloxone that fights the effects of an opioid overdose. (Grand Forks Herald Photo)
Narcan, a brand of the drug naxolone, can help fight opioid overdoses. (Grand Forks Herald/April Baumgarten)

Grand Forks Public Health has purchased nearly 240 Narcan kits for opioid overdose using a state-targeted response grant from the North Dakota Department of Human Services.

Upon a "call to action" from Mayor Mike Brown against opioid abuse in Grand Forks, the local Public Health Department received a $180,000 grant from the state to create an Opiate Response Project. In June, Grand Forks received another $160,000 grant for the same project.

Along with supporting local medication assisted treatment efforts and primary prevention, the money also was spent on buying kits containing Narcan, a brand name for the drug naloxone, to reverse the immediate effects of an opioid overdose. Kits the city bought for public entities to distribute cost approximately $72 per kit, said Michael Dulitz, coordinator for the Opiate Response Project in Grand Forks.

"Each two-dose kit has two individually packaged doses of Narcan," he said. "Each officer carries a dose in a pouch either on them or in the car."

The city also received 75 kits from the state to give to at-risk individuals during a satellite event. Eighty-eight of the 240 kits Dulitz's office bought also went to at-risk individuals and the public.

ADVERTISEMENT

"What we're trying to do is get it to people at high risk and to locations in the community with frequent contact with the public," he said.

The kits from the grant have been available since late 2017. The Grand Forks Fire Department has had access to naloxone through an agreement with Altru since May 2017. The Grand Forks Drug Task Force also had Narcan and training for the kits before Dulitz's office were able to distribute the safeguard.

Dulitz's project has contributed some of its funding to "One Rx", an educational initiative focused on educating patients with opioid prescriptions and pharmacists.

"They want to be able to do a screening for each individual getting (a prescription), to assess for overdose or misuse," he said.

That would save pharmacists from having to judge a patient's situation on their own, reducing some of the stigma, he said.

Related Topics: GRAND FORKS PUBLIC HEALTH
What To Read Next
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.
2022 saw more than three times as many pediatric (up to age 5) cannabis edible exposures in Minnesota compared to 2021. Here's what you can do to prevent your toddler from getting into the gummies.