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Grand Forks man sentenced for possessing meth; distribution charges dropped

A Grand Forks man was sentenced Monday to six months in jail for possessing methamphetamine. Three additional felony charges related to attempting to sell stimulants were dismissed as part of a plea agreement.

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Zachary Glenn Lynch

A Grand Forks man was sentenced Monday to six months in jail for possessing methamphetamine. Three additional felony charges related to attempting to sell stimulants were dismissed as part of a plea agreement.

Zachary Glenn Lynch, 40, was arrested Feb. 1 with three other people after drugs were found in their vehicle during a traffic stop. An affidavit for his arrest said police found numerous pills, baggies containing a crystal-like substance, drugs believed to be marijuana and numerous pieces of paraphernalia. A hypodermic needle also was found in Lynch's pocket, the affidavit said.

Lynch is the last to be sentenced in the incident.

RELATED: Four arrested on drug charges during traffic stop in Grand Forks

Kevin Roger Anderson, 24, Fosston, Minn., also will serve six months on the same charges with a similar plea agreement.

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The driver, Rebecca Lynn Gatica, 52, Grand Forks, was sentenced in May to three years in prison for possession of meth with the intent to deliver. Amelia Flores Trevino of Grand Forks was sentenced in May to one year after pleading guilty to charges alleging she intended to sell meth and stimulants.

Related Topics: POLICE
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