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Grand Forks man pleads guilty to stealing $4,000

A Grand Forks man pleaded guilty Monday to charges alleging he broke into a home and stole thousands of dollars in cash. Jason Allen Hart was sentenced to four months and allowed to serve his sentence on house arrest. He will be on probation for ...

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Special to The Forum

A Grand Forks man pleaded guilty Monday to charges alleging he broke into a home and stole thousands of dollars in cash.

Jason Allen Hart was sentenced to four months and allowed to serve his sentence on house arrest. He will be on probation for 18 months after.

Court documents allege he broke into a home on the 400 block of Campbell Drive sometime during the night of April 6, 2017. Police said there was blood on the shattered glass window of the back door and drops throughout the house.

Court documents said there was blood all over a drawer where the homeowner had hidden $4,000 cash.

DNA testing showed the blood matched Hart, an affidavit for his arrest said. The homeowners told police they knew others who were friends with Hart but did not allow him inside their home, court documents said.

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The maximum penalty for the felony burglary charge is five years in prison.

Related Topics: BURGLARY
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