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Grand Forks man get 65 months for dealing fentanyl

A Grand Forks man has been ordered to serve 65 months in prison for his part in an operation to import and distribute fentanyl across North Dakota and northwest Minnesota.

Tucker Christian Collings
Tucker Christian Collings
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A Grand Forks man has been ordered to serve 65 months in prison for his part in an operation to import and distribute fentanyl across North Dakota and northwest Minnesota.

On Tuesday, Judge Jeffrey Remick sentenced Tucker Christian Collings, 20, after he pleaded guilty Aug. 24 in Polk County District Court to a first-degree count of selling 50 grams or more in narcotics. He faced 40 years in prison and a $1 million fine.

Collins and five alleged co-conspirators were accused of dealing drugs in the Grand Forks area after a March overdose in the city led to the investigation. Reports indicated blue pills being distributed as oxycodone contained fentanyl, police said.

Police said Collings had 160 fentanyl pills in his possession at his Grand Forks apartment in March.

He also was charged in March in Grand Forks District Court with two counts of possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver-one Class A felony and the other a Class B felony-and a Class C felony charge of possessing drug paraphernalia. His next hearing in that case is scheduled for Feb. 8.

Related Topics: EAST GRAND FORKSPOLK COUNTY
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