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Grand Forks man accused of killing 5-month-old granted bond

A Grand Forks man accused of killing a 5-month-old girl will be held on a $100,000 bond, a judge ruled Monday. Family and friends of baby Brynley Rachelle Rymer crowded the courtroom Monday at the Grand Forks County Courthouse and muffled tears d...

4237901+brynley rymer.jpeg
Brynley Rymer

A Grand Forks man accused of killing a 5-month-old girl will be held on a $100,000 bond, a judge ruled Monday.

Family and friends of baby Brynley Rachelle Rymer crowded the courtroom Monday at the Grand Forks County Courthouse and muffled tears during Mason Matthew Kamrowski's hearing. He was arrested Friday and charged with the child's murder.

Kamrowski, 18, was watching Brynley, on the 3600 block of Landeco Lane on May 21. His lawyer, Tyler Morrow, said Kamrowski had just gotten home from work and was asked to watch the baby while two others went shopping. Police said Kamrowski was in a relationship with Brynley's mother but is not the child's father.

The baby suffered a medical emergency sometime between 6:30 p.m. and 8:17 p.m., when Kamrowski brought Brynley to Altru Hospital, Morrow said.

Brynley was later flown to Sanford Hospital in Fargo, where she died the next day, an affidavit for his arrest said.

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An autopsy report declared the death a homicide, and Assistant Grand Forks County State's Attorney Andrew Eyre said Brynley died from a traumatic brain injury.

Brynley's obituary said the child "brought sunshine to everyone's day with her sweet, sweet smile. She loved to be sang to and fall asleep in your arms and always got so excited when she heard her bottle shake. She hated tummy time and always wanted to be held."

Eyre asked Grand Forks District Judge Lolita Hartl Romanick to hold Kamrowski without bail because of the serious nature of the charges and a potential safety risk to the community.

If convicted, Kamrowski could spend life in prison without parole.

"It doesn't get more serious than that," Eyre said.

Morrow argued for a $25,000 bond and said his client would show up for court because he remained in Grand Forks during the four-month-long investigation. He said Kamrowski wouldn't have brought the baby to the hospital if he had harmed her.

"This is the single weakest probable cause statement I've ever seen in a murder case," he said.

Romanick set bond at $100,000 and said Kamrowski is not allowed to be in contact with minors if he makes bail.

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Kamrowski also has pending charges related to a robbery that ended with gunshots ringing out across the Sam's Club parking lot in March.

During that incident, he is accused of meeting up with Diamond Dennis Edward O'Donnell and Zachary Tyler Enockson and making plans to rob a 17-year-old boy they knew during a drug deal on March 20, according to court documents.

When they met the boy in the Sam's Club parking lot, 2551 32nd Ave. South, Kamrowski unsuccessfully grabbed at the boy's money after he got into Enockson's car, according to court documents. Enockson pepper sprayed him and the boy's friend Devon Hricak, 20, of Grand Forks shot at the car with a firearm.

Kamrowski will appear on the robbery charge Oct. 11.

He's scheduled to enter a plea for the murder charge Oct. 15.

112819.N.GFH.Mason Kamrowski
Mason Kamrowski

Related Topics: POLICE
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