Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Grand Forks drone company part of Carson Wentz video shoot

FARGO -- Several cameras captured Carson Wentz walking down Broadway in downtown Fargo for an ESPN video shoot, but only one filmed the NFL prospect from above. The aerial view of the North Dakota State University standout quarterback was supplie...

FARGO - Several cameras captured Carson Wentz walking down Broadway in downtown Fargo for an ESPN video shoot, but only one filmed the NFL prospect from above.

The aerial view of the North Dakota State University standout quarterback was supplied for the network's NFL draft coverage by an unmanned aircraft flown Monday by Grand Forks company SkySkopes.

"Just doing it for ESPN, for one, is cool but to film someone who might go No. 1 overall in the NFL draft is even better," SkySkopes President Matt Dunlevy told the Herald.

Footage of Wentz shot by the aircraft, also known as a drone, will be used in a segment slated to run during the draft's opening night on April 28, and in promotional spots airing before the three-day TV event.

Dunlevy said the company was directed to ESPN by local unmanned aircraft marketing firm Launchboxx.

ADVERTISEMENT

On Monday morning, SkySkopes employees accompanied the network's crew to shoot video in downtown Fargo and in the Fargodome.

As part of the filming process, a portion of Broadway closed to car and foot traffic for about three hours. Between the street and Fargodome locations, Dunlevy estimates the aircraft - a DJI S1000 - was in the air 45 minutes to an hour taking video.

The video will be compiled into a profile of Wentz called a "hero shoot" by ESPN officials and will feature Fargo and other North Dakota locations.

The shoot wasn't anything out of the ordinary for SkySkopes, said Dunlevy, adding the company has produced aerial video tours of the UND campus, Ralph Engelstad Arena and other Grand Forks fixtures.

"We were just filming a target, and Carson was the target of the shoot," Dunlevy said. "It was standard aerial cinematography."

That said, Dunlevy added the experience was a bit surreal, but joked that it wouldn't go to the SkySkopes team's heads. At the end of the day, he said the company is focused on securing more missions and performing them safely.

"It comes with a sense of purpose, that we're out there and we're doing things for Grand Forks, for Fargo and for the state of North Dakota," Dunlevy said. "It's really going to keep us and the state on the map."

What To Read Next
Artificial intelligence can now act as an artist or a writer. Does that mean AI is ready to play doctor? Many institutions, including Mayo Clinic, believe that AI is ready to become a useful tool.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.