Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Grand Forks DDA to search for new director as Sarah Prout moves to UND

Grand Forks' Downtown Development Association is launching a search for a new leader as Sarah Prout, executive director since August 2016, prepares to leave at the end of the month.

Sarah Prout, outgoing director of the Grand Forks Downtown Development Association (Herald photo/Sam Easter)
Sarah Prout, outgoing director of the Grand Forks Downtown Development Association (Herald photo/Sam Easter)

Grand Forks’ Downtown Development Association is launching a search for a new leader as Sarah Prout, executive director since August 2016 , prepares to leave at the end of the month.

“Sarah has played a critical role in the development and growth of the organization,” an announcement from the association says. “And while we will miss her and her leadership, we wish her the best of luck in her new endeavor as the director of marketing at the University of North Dakota Alumni Association and Foundation.”

The same announcement credits Prout with growing the group’s membership, its staff and its political footprint -- citing the DDA’s political advocacy on the future of Arbor Park. Prout also helped create an urban design and environment committee, the announcement states, which has worked to influence downtown development.

Sarah Horak, the president of the DDA’s Board of Directors, said the organization’s goal is to hire a new director “as soon as possible,” with the group’s leadership meeting in the next several days to set up a timeline.

Prout said in an interview that she has “the utmost confidence” in the DDA in its leadership search.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It’s truly been an honor, and I will always look back with affection, satisfaction and pride at the accomplishments of the DDA,” she said.

What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.