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Grand Forks Council approves public art plan

A revised version of a public arts plan that was criticized by Grand Forks City Council members last week was approved by the full council Tuesday with little discussion.

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A revised version of a public arts plan that was criticized by Grand Forks City Council members last week was approved by the full council Tuesday with little discussion.

Council members had concerns about the original public arts plan presented by the Grand Forks Public Arts Commission last week because it focused too much on 42nd Street South, they said, when the council had wanted a citywide arts plan.

The revised version of the plan presented Tuesday removed specific references to 42nd Street South, and did not contain references to any specific areas of the city, but maintained the original plan's guidelines for citywide public art.

Those guidelines include: researching existing public art and art programs in Grand Forks and the region, surveying other communities nationwide for best practices in public art, and meeting with the public and stakeholders on future public art plans.

Council member Bret Weber said the revisions made to the plan approved Tuesday put the arts plan in line with the City Council's original intentions.

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The Public Arts Commission is working with Twin Cities-based consultant Forecast Public Art on Grand Forks' public art plans, and a final "Arts and Culture Plan for Grand Forks" should be finished by the end of this year, said PAC Director Nicole Derenne.

Both the city and PAC each have dedicated $30,000 to the arts plan.

Related Topics: GRAND FORKS CITY COUNCIL
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