Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Grand Forks Central High takes third in State Student Congress

A team from Grand Forks Central High School took third place in the 49th annual State Student Congress competition, a North Dakota High School Activities Association event held in Mandan.

GF Central logo
We are part of The Trust Project.

A team from Grand Forks Central High School took third place in the 49th annual State Student Congress competition, a North Dakota High School Activities Association event held in Mandan.

Richardton-Taylor, N.D., was first, Fargo Shanley second, Central third, West Fargo fourth and Fargo Davies fifth, a NDHSAA news release said.

Tyler Degado, Joe Kalka and Esther Tak of Central took second places in the competition, and Tyler Nelson and Gary Yuan earned third places. Central students Steven Emmons, Rachel Fredstrom, Christian Liepold, Lucas Nelson and Lucas Reider also placed in the top eight in their competition categories.

From Grand Forks Red River High School, Andie Chandler and McKenzie Jones earned third places and Onyx Mulack and Christian Novak also placed in the top eight in their brackets.

From Carrington (N.D.) High School, students who placed in the top eight included Nathan Collins, Asha Gallagher, Alexis Larson, Isaac Rost, Mason Wede and Jordan Wold.

ADVERTISEMENT

The competition was Nov. 3-4.

Related Topics: EDUCATION
What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.