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Gophers wrestling under internal investigation over drug allegations

MINNEAPOLIS -- The University of Minnesota has initiated an internal investigation of its wrestling program, which last week became embroiled in allegations of a prescription-drug ring among its student-athletes.

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MINNEAPOLIS - The University of Minnesota has initiated an internal investigation of its wrestling program, which last week became embroiled in allegations of a prescription-drug ring among its student-athletes.

A statement released by the school Tuesday said campus police are investigating whether some wrestlers were using and selling Xanax, an anti-anxiety drug that requires a prescription.

“The alleged serious behavior in our wrestling program, if true, is unacceptable and will not be tolerated,” the school said.

The U has launched its own probe “in close coordination with UMPD ... and it is our intention to fully investigate the concerning allegations involving our students and staff.”

Citing an anonymous student-athlete, the

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Minneapolis-based Star Tribune reported last week that coach J Robinson tried to handle the problem internally and never notified his superiors, an allegation he denied Tuesday through his agent.

In a letter sent to media outlets, Wisconsin-based attorney James C. W. Bock said Robinson notified his superiors of the situation and requested drug testing for his athletes “through multiple channels” in late March.

The letter does not mention the allegation that some of his wrestlers were selling the drugs.

Beth Goetz was the interim athletics director at the time. She has since been replaced by Mark Coyle, who started his job this week. An email to the athletics department requesting comment was not immediately returned.

In his letter, Bock said the university has electronic communications verifying Robinson’s story. The Pioneer Press on Tuesday requested copies of those emails.

Related Topics: WRESTLING
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